The Ten Virtues

Posted on April 13, 2008. Filed under: religion |

THE TEN VIRTUES

THE TEN VIRTUES


I WILL CONTROL MY THOUGHTS

I WILL CONTROL MY ACTIONS

I WILL HAVE DEVOTION OF PURPOSE

I WILL HAVE FAITH IN THE ABILITY
OF THE MASTER TO TEACH THE TRUTH

I WILL HAVE FAITH IN MY ABILITY TO ASSIMILATE THE TRUTH

I WILL HAVE FAITH IN MY ABILITY TO WIELD THE TRUTH

I WILL BE FREE FROM RESENTMENT
UNDER THE EXPERIENCE OF PERSECUTION

I WILL BE FREE FROM RESENTMENT
UNDER THE EXEPERIENCE OF WRONG DOING

I WILL CULTIVATE THE ABILITY TO DISTINGUISH RIGHT FROM WRONG

I WILL CULTIVATE THE ABILITY TO TELL THE REAL FROM THE UNREAL

__________

__________

Selections from “THE HUSIA”

Sacred Wisdom of Ancient Egypt

“The title of this text, The Husia, is taken from two ancient Egyptian words which signify the two divine powers by which “Ra [Ptah] created the world, i.e., “HU”, authoritative utterance and “Sia”, exceptional insight. Thus I have put the two together to express the concept “authoritative utterance of exceptional insight”. Given the importance of authoritative utterance and exceptional insight to the moral and spiritual realm and their divine character in ancient Egyptian theology, Husia appears as both compelling and proper as a title for a text of ancient Egyptian sacred writings.” –Dr. Maulana Karenga, Taken from the book “The Husia”, The University of Sankore Press, Los Angeles

Be not arrogant because of your knowledge. Take counsel with the ignorant as well as the wise: For the limits of knowledge in any field have never been set and no one has ever reached them. Wisdom is rarer than emeralds, and yet it is found among the women who gather at the grindstones.

When the messenger of death comes to take you, let him find you ready to go to your resting place, saying; “Here comes one prepared before you”. Do not say then “I am too young to be taken”. For death comes and seizes the baby at his or her mother’s breast as well as the man and woman who have reached an old age.

Guard against words and deeds of deception and against words that are untrue. Destroy the desire to do and speak evil within you, for the evil man has no rest.

Stay away from the aggressive man and take him not for a companion. Take then for a friend one who is true and just, one whose actions you have observed: And if your righteousness equals his or hers, your friendship will be balanced.

Beware of robbing the poor and of oppressing the weak and helpless. Raise not your hand against the aged nor address an elder wit improper speech. Let not yourself be sent on an evil mission nor stand in the company of those who have performed it. Rage not against those who injure you, nor on your account answer them. The wharf falls from under the wicked and a flood of water washes them away. The north wind comes down to end their hour on earth and turns into a tempest; the thunder roars and the crocodiles come without mercy.

Let us steer a righteous course so that we may carry the wicked across without becoming like them. Raise them up, give them your hand and then, leave them in the hands of God. Fill them with the food of your kindness that they might be satisfied and repent. Another thing good in the heart of God is that you pause and think before speaking.

Do not argue with the contentious, nor provoke them with words. Pause before those who interrupt and give way to those who verbally attack you. Sleep a night before speaking: For the unrestrained person is like a storm which bursts forth like a flame in a pile of straw.

If you are a leader and command many, strive for excellence in all you do so that no fault can be found in your character. For Maat-the way of Truth, Justice, and Righteousness- is great; its value is lasting and it has remained unequalled and unchanged since the time of its Creator. It lies as a plain path before even the ignorant and those who violate its laws are punished. Although wickedness may gain wealth, wrong-doing has never brought its wares to a safe port. In the end, it is Maat, the way of Truth, Justice and Righteousness- that endures and enables the upright to say: “It is the legacy of my father and mother.

Be diligent as long as you live, always doing more than is commanded of you. Do not misuse your time while following your heart, for it is offensive to the soul t waste one’s time. Do not loose the daily opportunity to increase that which you have. Diligence produces gains and gains do not endure when diligence is abandoned.

If you are a powerful person, gain respect through knowledge and gentleness of speech and conduct: Give commands only where necessary and fitting. Those who abuse their authority provoke resistance. And those who place themselves above others are brought low. Be not silent when it is your duty to speak, but be cautious in your speech lest you offend: When you answer the angry, show self-control. For the angry heart speaks fiery words, but those who walk gently, their path is already paved; moreover, those who worry all day have no happy moment. But those who pursue pleasure all day will not be able to sustain themselves.

Do not go in and out of the court of justice so that your name may not be soiled. Do not contend in a quarrel. Keep silent and it will serve you well. Go not in the presence of a drunkard even if it promises to bring you honor.

Do hot frequent taverns lest evil words fall from your mouth and you know not what you are saying. If you fall, your limbs may be broken and there will be no one to help you. Even your drinking companions may stand up and say: “Put the drunkard out”. If one comes t seek and talk with you, one will find you lying on the ground as if you were a little child.

Now, the unrestrained man or woman in the temple is like a tree grown in unfertile ground. Its leaves wither quickly and its unripe fruit falls to the earth. It reaches its end in the lumber yard or it is floated far from its place. And its burial cloth becomes a flame of fire. But the self-mastered man or woman sets himself or herself apart. He or she is like a tree grown in fertile ground. It grows green and doubles its yield of fruit. It has its place in the eyes of its owner. Its fruit is sweet, its shade is pleasant and its end is reached in the garden.

Follow the footsteps of your ancestors, for the mind is trained through knowledge. Behold, their words endure in books. Open and read them and follow their wise counsel. For one who taught becomes skilled. Do not be evil for kindness is good. Make the memory of you last through love of you. Multiply the people whom the city shelters. The God will be praised for your donations. And the people will…give thanks for your goodness and pray for your health.

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    a weblog about people and the things we do examined in light of the teachings of the Hetep Buddha Dhamma.

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